header_center

adv

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HELPLINE 1-888-417-2742

Empowering South Asian women to overcome domestic violence and become self-reliant.

adv

SENIORS & CAREGIVERS HELPLINE 1-833-999-9080

Now providing guidance to all South Asian seniors and caregivers in the DC Metro area.

adv1

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HELPLINE 1-888-417-2742

Empowering South Asian women to overcome domestic violence and become self-reliant.

advtxt1

SENIORS & CAREGIVERS HELPLINE 1-833-999-9080

Now providing guidance to all South Asian seniors and caregivers in the DC Metro area.

header_right

Dial 911
quick exit button QUICK EXIT
Leave now if you
are being watched!

call

b1

b2

Listen to the October buzz, PLAY A PART!

Oct 12, 2019

October is domestic violence awareness month, a time when people of all ages and occupations come together with non-profits, legislators, law givers to express solidarity against domestic violence.

It's time to PLAY A PART!

Check out events taking place all over Washington DC metro area. Talk, participate, change mindsets.

https://dccadv.org/dvam/dvam-calendar/

https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/familyservices/domestic-sexual-violence/domestic-violence-awareness-month

 

READ MORE ABOUT IT

Resource: https://fairygodboss.com/career-topics/national-domestic-violence-awareness-month

Background and history.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month was first held in 1987, the same year as the debut of the first national domestic violence toll-free hotline. Two years later, Congress passed Public Law 101-112, officially designating October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. 

The idea evolved from October 1981's "Day of Unity," an event for connecting those who work to end domestic abuse, by the NCADV.  The day evolved into a week of activities and awareness campaigns held at the local, state and national levels. 

Three key themes were present in these weeks, according to the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence:

Mourning those who have died because of domestic violence
Celebrating those who have survived
Connecting those who work to end violence

Now, the first Monday of October is recognized as the Day of Unity. 

What is the definition of domestic violence?

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, domestic violence:

includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

3 Reasons to support National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

1. The problem is far from being solved.

As the numbers show, we have a long way to go to end domestic abuse. Awareness drives action, and a monthlong recognition of the issue at hand helps spur change. 

2. You can help. 

Awareness and support are two ways everyone can get involved with an issue that affects so many people across the U.S. Whether your organization takes part in a larger call to action, or if you decide to take action at an individual level, whether through donations of time or money or something else, it's essential to consider what you can do to help the cause.

3. It's personal.

With one in three women and one in four men suffering severe abuse from a partner, it's highly likely that someone in your life has suffered. Educate yourself and others on what resources are in your area, and what the signs of abuse look like and how you can help. 

b3

ASHA NEWSLETTER